How Early Life Religious Exposure Relates to the Timing of First Birth

Pearce, Lisa D.; & Davis, Shannon N. (2016). How Early Life Religious Exposure Relates to the Timing of First Birth. Journal of Marriage and Family, 78(5), 1422-38. PMCID: PMC5479316

Pearce, Lisa D.; & Davis, Shannon N. (2016). How Early Life Religious Exposure Relates to the Timing of First Birth. Journal of Marriage and Family, 78(5), 1422-38. PMCID: PMC5479316

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This article examines intermediary processes explaining how religious socialization and involvement early in life are related to the timing of first births for women in the United States. The theory of conjunctural action forms the basis for hypotheses for how religious schemas and materials operate to influence birth timing. Using the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth data and event history methods, the study finds evidence for expected family size, work-family gender ideology, educational attainment and enrollment, cohabitation, and age at marriage as mediators of associations between early life religious exposure (affiliation and attendance) and the timing of nonmaritally and maritally conceived first births. These findings corroborate other research identifying the long reach of religious socialization and involvement in youth, elucidate some of the pathways for these connections, and motivate further work to understand linkages between religion and family behaviors in the United States.




JOUR



Pearce, Lisa D.
Davis, Shannon N.



2016


Journal of Marriage and Family

78

5

1422-38








PMC5479316


10043

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