Trends in Added Sugars from Packaged Beverages Available to and Purchased by US Households, 2007-2012

Ng, Shu Wen; Ostrowski, Jessica D.; & Li, Kuo-ping. (2017). Trends in Added Sugars from Packaged Beverages Available to and Purchased by US Households, 2007-2012. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 106(1), 179-88. PMCID: PMC5486203

Ng, Shu Wen; Ostrowski, Jessica D.; & Li, Kuo-ping. (2017). Trends in Added Sugars from Packaged Beverages Available to and Purchased by US Households, 2007-2012. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 106(1), 179-88. PMCID: PMC5486203

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Background: The US Food and Drug Administration’s updated nutrition labeling requirements will include added sugars starting in July 2018, but there is no existing measure of the added sugar content of products and what they represent among purchases. Beverages are one of the first targets for reducing added sugar consumption, hence the focus here. Objective: Provide estimates of trends in added sugars from non-alcoholic packaged beverage products available in the US, and amounts of added sugars obtained from these beverages given the purchases of US households overall and by subpopulations. Design: Using nutrition label data from multiple sources, we use a step-wise approach to derive the added sugar content of 160,713 beverage product records reported purchased by US households in 2007-2012 (345,193 observations from 110,539 unique households). We estimate the amounts of added sugars obtained from packaged beverages US households report buying in 2007-08, 2009-10 and 2011-12 overall and by subpopulations (household composition, race/ethnicity and income). The key outcomes are added sugars in terms of grams per capita per day, and percent of calories from packaged beverages. Results: Packaged beverages alone account for 12 g/capita/day of added sugars purchased by US households in 2007-2012, representing 32-48% of calories from packaged beverages. While the absolute amount of added sugars from beverages has not changed meaningfully over time, the relative contribution of added sugars to beverage calories has risen. Non-Hispanic Black households and lower income households obtain both higher absolute and relative amounts of added sugars from beverages than non-Hispanic White households and higher income households (all p<0.01)




JOUR



Ng, Shu Wen
Ostrowski, Jessica D.
Li, Kuo-ping



2017


American Journal of Clinical Nutrition

106

1

179-88








PMC5486203


10109

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