Intermittent Preventive Therapy in Pregnancy and Incidence of Low Birth Weight in Malaria-Endemic Countries

Cates, Jordan E.; Westreich, Daniel J.; Unger, Holger W.; Bauserman, Melissa S.; Adair, Linda S.; Cole, Stephen R.; Meshnick, Steven R.; & Rogerson, Stephen J., for the Maternal Malaria and Malnutrition (M3) Initiative. (2018). Intermittent Preventive Therapy in Pregnancy and Incidence of Low Birth Weight in Malaria-Endemic Countries. American Journal of Public Health, 108(3), 399-406. PMCID: PMC5803815

Cates, Jordan E.; Westreich, Daniel J.; Unger, Holger W.; Bauserman, Melissa S.; Adair, Linda S.; Cole, Stephen R.; Meshnick, Steven R.; & Rogerson, Stephen J., for the Maternal Malaria and Malnutrition (M3) Initiative. (2018). Intermittent Preventive Therapy in Pregnancy and Incidence of Low Birth Weight in Malaria-Endemic Countries. American Journal of Public Health, 108(3), 399-406. PMCID: PMC5803815

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OBJECTIVES: To estimate the impact of hypothetical antimalarial and nutritional interventions (which reduce the prevalence of low midupper arm circumference [MUAC]) on the incidence of low birth weight (LBW). METHODS: We analyzed data from 14 633 pregnancies from 13 studies conducted across Africa and the Western Pacific from 1996 to 2015. We calculated population intervention effects for increasing intermittent preventive therapy in pregnancy (IPTp), full coverage with bed nets, reduction in malaria infection at delivery, and reductions in the prevalence of low MUAC. RESULTS: We estimated that, compared with observed IPTp use, administering 3 or more doses of IPTp to all women would decrease the incidence of LBW from 9.9% to 6.9% (risk difference = 3.0%; 95% confidence interval = 1.7%, 4.0%). The intervention effects for eliminating malaria at delivery, increasing bed net ownership, and decreasing low MUAC prevalence were all modest. CONCLUSIONS: Increasing IPTp uptake to at least 3 doses could decrease the incidence of LBW in malaria-endemic countries. The impact of IPTp on LBW was greater than the effect of prevention of malaria, consistent with a nonmalarial effect of IPTp, measurement error, or selection bias.




JOUR



Cates, Jordan E.
Westreich, Daniel J.
Unger, Holger W.
Bauserman, Melissa S.
Adair, Linda S.
Cole, Stephen R.
Meshnick, Steven R.
Rogerson, Stephen J., for the Maternal Malaria and Malnutrition (M3) Initiative



2018


American Journal of Public Health

108

3

399-406








PMC5803815


10766

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