Anxiety’s Relationship to Inconsistent Use of Oral Contraceptives

Walsemann, Katrina M.; & Perez, Anthony Daniel. (2006). Anxiety’s Relationship to Inconsistent Use of Oral Contraceptives. Health Education & Behavior, 33(2), 197-214.

Walsemann, Katrina M.; & Perez, Anthony Daniel. (2006). Anxiety’s Relationship to Inconsistent Use of Oral Contraceptives. Health Education & Behavior, 33(2), 197-214.

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Five percent of typical oral contraceptive users experience an unintended pregnancy every year. Inconsistent use of oral contraception may be a leading contributor to the high rate of unintended pregnancy among oral contraceptive users. Previous medical research also suggests that anxiety may play a role in medication compliance, yet no known studies have examined the relationship between anxiety and oral contraceptive use. To test this relationship, the authors analyze data from the National Survey of Family Growth Cycle V (NSFG-V), restricting
their sample to sexually activewomen currently taking oral contraceptives. They find thatwomenwho report multiple episodes of anxiety lasting at least 6 months have a greater probability of inconsistent use. The authors suggest goals for future research and discuss the role of health care professionals in addressing oral contraception compliance in light of their findings.


Sexual Behavior, Contraceptive Use, and Reproductive Health


JOUR



Walsemann, Katrina M.
Perez, Anthony Daniel



2006


Health Education & Behavior

33

2

197-214










3783

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