Family Influences on Children’s Well-Being: Potential Roles of Molecular Genetics and Epigenetics

Guo, Guang. (2011). Family Influences on Children’s Well-Being: Potential Roles of Molecular Genetics and Epigenetics. In Booth, Alan, McHale, Susan M., Landale, Nancy S. & McHale, Susan M. (Eds.), Biosocial Foundations of Family Processes (pp. 181-204). New York: Springer.

Guo, Guang. (2011). Family Influences on Children’s Well-Being: Potential Roles of Molecular Genetics and Epigenetics. In Booth, Alan, McHale, Susan M., Landale, Nancy S. & McHale, Susan M. (Eds.), Biosocial Foundations of Family Processes (pp. 181-204). New York: Springer.

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We address a number of questions related to the potential roles of molecular genetics and epigenetics in estimating family effects on children’s well-being. What is the nature of family effects? Where do we need genetics? What is our best evidence? What could we do at the moment and in the next 10 years? We review relevant advances in molecular genetics over the past few decades and discuss what these advances may contribute to social sciences. We focus on gene–environment interactions for delinquency. We define the concept and describe an empirical study. We also review an earlier animal gene–environment/experience study to understand the prospects of human gene–environment studies. Very soon, we may create a gigantic amount of genetic and epigenetic data, but appropriate ways of analyzing these data and proper interpretations of the findings remain enormously challenging.


Fertility, Families, and Children
Biological and Social Interactions


CHAP

Biosocial Foundations of Family Processes

National Symposium on Family Issues

Guo, Guang

Booth, Alan
McHale, Susan M.
Landale, Nancy S.
McHale, Susan M.

Booth, Alan

2011





181-204




Springer

New York





4986

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