Gendered Measures, Gendered Models: Toward an Intersectional Analysis of Interpersonal Racial Discrimination

Harnois, Catherine E.; & Ifatunji, Mosi Adesina. (2011). Gendered Measures, Gendered Models: Toward an Intersectional Analysis of Interpersonal Racial Discrimination. Ethnic and Racial Studies, 34(6), 1006-28.

Harnois, Catherine E.; & Ifatunji, Mosi Adesina. (2011). Gendered Measures, Gendered Models: Toward an Intersectional Analysis of Interpersonal Racial Discrimination. Ethnic and Racial Studies, 34(6), 1006-28.

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In this paper we draw from black and multiracial feminist theories to argue that interpersonal racial discrimination should be understood as a potentially gendered phenomenon. While there are some discriminatory practices that are directed at both black men and black women, some forms of racial discrimination affect men more than women, and some affect women more than men. Still other forms may be gender-specific. Our review of existing literature shows that most survey research has utilized measures and models of racial discrimination that fail to account for these gender differences. Drawing on the 2001-2003 National Survey of American Life (NSAL) we demonstrate the importance of gender for understanding and analysing interpersonal racial discrimination. We offer concrete ways for social researchers to centralize gender in their analyses. By doing so, we hope to advance the development of an intersectional approach to racial discrimination. In this paper we draw from black and multiracial feminist theories to argue that interpersonal racial discrimination should be understood as a potentially gendered phenomenon. While there are some discriminatory practices that are directed at both black men and black women, some forms of racial discrimination affect men more than women, and some affect women more than men. Still other forms may be gender-specific. Our review of existing literature shows that most survey research has utilized measures and models of racial discrimination that fail to account for these gender differences. Drawing on the 2001-2003 National Survey of American Life (NSAL) we demonstrate the importance of gender for understanding and analysing interpersonal racial discrimination. We offer concrete ways for social researchers to centralize gender in their analyses. By doing so, we hope to advance the development of an intersectional approach to racial discrimination.


Population Movement, Diversity, Inequality
1C
2a


JOUR



Harnois, Catherine E.
Ifatunji, Mosi Adesina



2011


Ethnic and Racial Studies

34

6

1006-28










8567

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