Quality of Care and Contraceptive Use in Urban Kenya

Tumlinson, Katherine; Pence, Brian Wells; Curtis, Sian L.; Marshall, Stephen W.; & Speizer, Ilene S. (2015). Quality of Care and Contraceptive Use in Urban Kenya. International Perspectives on Sexual and Reproductive Health, 41(2), 69-79. PMCID: PMC4548971

Tumlinson, Katherine; Pence, Brian Wells; Curtis, Sian L.; Marshall, Stephen W.; & Speizer, Ilene S. (2015). Quality of Care and Contraceptive Use in Urban Kenya. International Perspectives on Sexual and Reproductive Health, 41(2), 69-79. PMCID: PMC4548971

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CONTEXT: Family planning is highly beneficial to women’s overall health, morbidity, and mortality, particularly in developing countries. Yet, in much of sub-Saharan Africa, contraceptive prevalence remains low while unmet need for family planning remains high. It has been frequently hypothesized that the poor quality of family planning service provision in many low-income settings acts as a barrier to optimal rates of contraceptive use but this association has not been rigorously tested. METHODS: Using data collected from 3,990 women in 2010, this study investigates the association between family planning service quality and current modern contraceptive use in five cities in Kenya. In addition to individual-level data, audits of select facilities and service provider interviews were conducted in 260 facilities. Within 126 higher-volume clinics, exit interviews were conducted with family planning clients. Individual and facility-level data are linked based on the source of the woman’s current method or other health service. Adjusted prevalence ratios are estimated using binomial regression and we account for clustering of observations within facilities using robust standard errors. RESULTS: Solicitation of client preferences, assistance with method selection, provision of information by providers on side effects, and provider treatment of clients were all associated with a significantly increased likelihood of current modern contraceptive use and effects were often stronger among younger and less educated women. CONCLUSION: Efforts to strengthen contraceptive security and improve the content of contraceptive counseling and treatment of clients by providers have the potential to significantly increase contraceptive use in urban Kenya.




JOUR



Tumlinson, Katherine
Pence, Brian Wells
Curtis, Sian L.
Marshall, Stephen W.
Speizer, Ilene S.



2015


International Perspectives on Sexual and Reproductive Health

41

2

69-79








PMC4548971


8850

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