Hispanic Older Adult Health & Longevity in the United States: Current Patterns & Concerns for the Future

Hummer, Robert A.; & Hayward, Mark D. (2015). Hispanic Older Adult Health & Longevity in the United States: Current Patterns & Concerns for the Future. Daedalus: Journal of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, 144(2), 20-30. PMCID: PMC4465804

Hummer, Robert A.; & Hayward, Mark D. (2015). Hispanic Older Adult Health & Longevity in the United States: Current Patterns & Concerns for the Future. Daedalus: Journal of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, 144(2), 20-30. PMCID: PMC4465804

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The Hispanic population aged sixty-five and over – the most socioeconomically disadvantaged subset of America's elderly – is projected to quintuple between 2012 and 2050. While current longevity patterns for Hispanics relative to whites are favorable, old-age functioning and disability patterns for Hispanics are unfavorable and have serious implications for caregivers; families; and local, state, and federal governments. Troubling signs for the future Hispanic population (which are shared to varying degrees with other vulnerable groups) include the unresolved legal status of unauthorized immigrants, continued low levels of insurance coverage even after health care reform, some unfavorable trends in health behaviors, and continued disadvantages in educational attainment and income relative to whites. We urge policy-makers to deal with these potentially problematic health and well-being issues. Not doing so could have detrimental consequences for the future of the Hispanic population as well as other at-risk groups and, by extension, the U.S. elderly population as a whole.




JOUR



Hummer, Robert A.
Hayward, Mark D.



2015


Daedalus: Journal of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences

144

2

20-30








PMC4465804


8914

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