Good Jobs, Bad Jobs

Kalleberg, Arne L. (2016). Good Jobs, Bad Jobs. In Edgell, Stephen, Gottfried, Heidi & Granter, Edward (Eds.), The SAGE Handbook of the Sociology of Work and Employment (pp. 111-28). Los Angeles: SAGE Publications.

Kalleberg, Arne L. (2016). Good Jobs, Bad Jobs. In Edgell, Stephen, Gottfried, Heidi & Granter, Edward (Eds.), The SAGE Handbook of the Sociology of Work and Employment (pp. 111-28). Los Angeles: SAGE Publications.

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Creating good jobs and avoiding bad jobs are major priorities for all nations because work is central to human welfare and to the functioning of organizations and societies. The notion of job quality communicates that it is the nature of work that is important to workers, not just whether they have any job at all. Job quality has been historically a major theme in the study of work and employment, and has always attracted a great deal of attention from a diverse group of social scientists. The prevalence of bad jobs – such as marginal and irregular work – was common among the laboring classes in industrial countries in the nineteenth century. The ratio of good jobs to bad jobs increased sharply in the twentieth century – especially during the high rates of economic growth after World War II – as unions and governments in many countries helped to construct labor market institutions that provided relatively well-paying and secure jobs.




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The SAGE Handbook of the Sociology of Work and Employment


Kalleberg, Arne L.

Edgell, Stephen
Gottfried, Heidi
Granter, Edward


2016





111-28




SAGE Publications

Los Angeles





9783

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