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Pathways between childhood/adolescent adversity, adolescent socioeconomic status, and long-term cardiovascular disease risk in young adulthood

Doom, Jenalee R.; Mason, Susan M.; Suglia, Shakira F.; & Clark, Cari Jo. (2017). Pathways between childhood/adolescent adversity, adolescent socioeconomic status, and long-term cardiovascular disease risk in young adulthood. Social Science and Medicine, 188, 166-175. PMCID: PMC5558845 NIHMSID: NIHMS892601

Doom, Jenalee R.; Mason, Susan M.; Suglia, Shakira F.; & Clark, Cari Jo. (2017). Pathways between childhood/adolescent adversity, adolescent socioeconomic status, and long-term cardiovascular disease risk in young adulthood. Social Science and Medicine, 188, 166-175. PMCID: PMC5558845 NIHMSID: NIHMS892601

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The current study investigated mediators between childhood/adolescent adversities (e.g., dating violence, maltreatment, homelessness, and parental death), low socioeconomic status (SES) during adolescence, and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk in young adulthood. The purpose of these analyses was to understand whether SES during adolescence and childhood/adolescent adversities affect CVD risk through similar pathways, including maternal relationship quality, health behaviors, financial stress, medical/dental care, educational attainment, sleep problems, and depressive symptoms. Using the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (N = 14,493), which has followed US adolescents (Wave 1; M = 15.9 years) through early adulthood (Wave 4; M = 28.9 years), associations were examined between childhood/adolescent adversity and SES to 30-year CVD risk in young adulthood. The outcome was a Framingham-based prediction model of CVD risk that included age, sex, body mass index, smoking, systolic blood pressure, diabetes, and antihypertensive medication use at Wave 4. Path analysis was used to examine paths through the adolescent maternal relationship to young adult mediators of CVD risk. Childhood/adolescent adversity significantly predicted greater adult CVD risk through the following pathways: maternal relationship, health behaviors, financial stress, lack of medical/dental care, and educational attainment; but not through depressive symptoms or sleep problems. Lower SES during adolescence significantly predicted greater adult CVD risk through the following pathways: health behaviors, financial stress, lack of medical/dental care, and educational attainment, but not maternal relationship, depressive symptoms, or sleep problems. Childhood/adolescent adversities and SES affected CVD risk in young adulthood through both similar and unique pathways that may inform interventions.


United States
Adversity
Adolescence
CVD
Socioeconomic status
Add Health
Young adulthood


JOUR



Doom, Jenalee R.
Mason, Susan M.
Suglia, Shakira F.
Clark, Cari Jo



2017


Social Science and Medicine

188


166-175


July 24, 2017




0277-9536

10.1016/j.socscimed.2017.06.044

PMC5558845

NIHMS892601

7086