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The moderating effects of intelligence: An examination of how IQ influences the association between environmental factors and antisocial behavior

Silver, Ian A.; & Nedelec, Joseph L. (2018). The moderating effects of intelligence: An examination of how IQ influences the association between environmental factors and antisocial behavior. Journal of Criminal Justice, 54, 62-75.

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Purpose: Prior scholarship has illustrated that key criminological concepts from both social learning theory and social control theory influence antisocial behavior. While generally robust in their methodologies, potential moderating effects have rarely been considered within the criminological literature. Specifically, it can be hypothesized that some individual differences influence the observed association between key criminological concepts and antisocial behavior. To address the limitations of some existing scholarship, the current study examines the moderating effects of IQ on the association between key criminological constructs and antisocial behavior. Methods: Using the restricted available Add Health data (N = 1102–3556), the current study conducted 48 regression analyses (44 OLS and four binary logistic regression analyses) moderated by IQ, wherein antisocial behavior was regressed on peer drug use, maternal conflict, paternal conflict, maternal involvement, paternal involvement, parental supervision, neighborhood disadvantage, school attachment, and social support on antisocial behavior. Results: The findings provided evidence suggesting that IQ moderated the effects of key criminological constructs on antisocial behavior such as peer drug use and neighborhood disadvantage. However, the moderating effects of IQ diminished as participants aged. Conclusion: Overall, the findings generally provided evidence suggesting that IQ moderated the association between criminological concepts and antisocial behavior.




JOUR



Silver, Ian A.
Nedelec, Joseph L.



2018

2018/2//

Journal of Criminal Justice

54


62-75


January 18, 2018




0047-2352

10.1016/j.jcrimjus.2017.12.001



7288