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Do adolescent perceived survival expectations predict sexually transmitted infections in young adulthood?

Barry, Megan; Kahn, Nicole Fran; & Halpern, Carolyn Tucker. (2018). Do adolescent perceived survival expectations predict sexually transmitted infections in young adulthood? Annual Meeting of the Population Association of America. Denver, CO.

Barry, Megan; Kahn, Nicole Fran; & Halpern, Carolyn Tucker. (2018). Do adolescent perceived survival expectations predict sexually transmitted infections in young adulthood? Annual Meeting of the Population Association of America. Denver, CO.

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Background: There are 20 million new sexually transmitted infections (STIs) in the United States each year, and half of these are among young people aged 15 to 24.

Methods: A logit model on a subset of National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent and Adult Health respondents (n = 12,129) tests whether perceived survival expectations assessed in adolescence mediate the relationship between race/ethnicity and test-identified STI diagnosis in young adulthood.

Results: Among females, low perceived survival expectations play a small role in predicting the probability of having a test-identified STI in young adulthood. Non-Hispanic black, Hispanic, and youth of non-Hispanic other race have a higher predicted probability of having a test-identified STI, respectively, than those who are non-Hispanic white, ceteris paribus.

Conclusion: These results suggest that interventions targeted at reducing STIs should focus on minority adolescents and young adults and the unique challenges that they may face in preventing STIs.


reproductive health
sexually transmitted infections
STIs
survival expectations
race
ethnicity


CONF

Annual Meeting of the Population Association of America

Fertility, family planning, sexual behavior, and reproductive health 1

Barry, Megan
Kahn, Nicole Fran
Halpern, Carolyn Tucker



2018










Denver, CO





7745