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Students and Perceived School Safety: The Impact of School Security Measures

Perumean-Chaney, S. E.; & Sutton, L. M. (2013). Students and Perceived School Safety: The Impact of School Security Measures. American Journal of Criminal Justice, 38(4), 570-588.

Perumean-Chaney, S. E.; & Sutton, L. M. (2013). Students and Perceived School Safety: The Impact of School Security Measures. American Journal of Criminal Justice, 38(4), 570-588.

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Although secondary school violence has actually decreased, public concern over student safety is still prevalent. One response to publicized school violence has been the implementation of security measures (metal detectors, cameras) and policies (visitor sign in, locked doors). While these changes may decrease school violence, little research has examined the effect these security measures have on student perceptions of school safety. Utilizing the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (AddHealth), this study found that metal detectors and the number of visible security measures employed in school were associated with a decrease in student reports of feeling safe. Students who were male, White, had higher GPAs, and reported feeling safe in their neighborhood were more likely to report feeling safe at school, while those who experienced prior victimizations, had larger class sizes, and who attended schools that had disorder problems were more likely to report not feeling safe at school. © 2012 Southern Criminal Justice Association.


AddHealth
School safety
School security measures
Student perceptions


JOUR



Perumean-Chaney, S. E.
Sutton, L. M.



2013


American Journal of Criminal Justice

38

4

570-588






10662316 (ISSN)

10.1007/s12103-012-9182-2



4740