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Exposure to Violence as a Mediator of MAOA's Effect on Behavior: A Biosocial Theory Perspective

Clady, Derrick L. (2016). Exposure to Violence as a Mediator of MAOA's Effect on Behavior: A Biosocial Theory Perspective. Master's thesis / Doctoral dissertation, Northcentral University.

Clady, Derrick L. (2016). Exposure to Violence as a Mediator of MAOA's Effect on Behavior: A Biosocial Theory Perspective. Master's thesis / Doctoral dissertation, Northcentral University.

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Data from crime reporting surveys such as the Uniform Crime Report (UCR) and National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS) show a decrease in violent crime in the United States in recent years, yet aggressive and violent antisocial behavior (AVAB) seems to persist between some people solving disputes, though it does not always result in assault, battery, or homicide. However, in the cases that result in such violent behavior, social elements alone may not be the sole cause of aggressive escalation during an argument. Such behavior may have a genetic component that is not widely known. In many studies examining aggressive and violent antisocial behavior from a biosocial theoretical perspective, the findings have demonstrated how genetic and environmental risk factor interactions often produce aggressive and violent antisocial behavior. A quantitative research study was conducted to determine if exposure to violence can mediate monoamine oxidase -A’s (MAOA) effect on aggressive and violent antisocial behavior. The independent variable is MAOA as a genetic risk factor with aggressive, violent antisocial behavior being the dependent variable, and exposure to violence as a socioenvironmental mediating variable risk factor. A loglinear analysis was conducted using archival data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health) study codebooks datasets. The codebooks contain the survey questions and response frequency data of from 75,290 responses from 15,701 respondents. The results of the analyses revealed that MAOA was moderately associated with exposure to violence and aggressive and violent antisocial behavior. Additional analyses revealed that exposure to violence interacts with MAOA and aggressive and violent antisocial behavior.


Social sciences
Biological sciences
Psychology
Add health
Antisocial behavior
Biosocial theory
Exposure to violence
Genetics
MAOA
Neurosciences
Behavioral Sciences
Criminology
0602:Behavioral Sciences
0627:Criminology
0317:Neurosciences


THES



Clady, Derrick L.

Lamoureux, Michelle

Tippins, Steven

2016



10149967


209




Northcentral University

Ann Arbor

9781369050639




6725