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Voice disorders and associated risk markers among young adults in the United States

Bainbridge, Kathleen E.; Roy, Nelson; Losonczy, Katalin G.; Hoffman, Howard J.; & Cohen, Seth M. (2017). Voice disorders and associated risk markers among young adults in the United States. The Laryngoscope, 127(9), 2093-2099. PMCID: PMC5481531

Bainbridge, Kathleen E.; Roy, Nelson; Losonczy, Katalin G.; Hoffman, Howard J.; & Cohen, Seth M. (2017). Voice disorders and associated risk markers among young adults in the United States. The Laryngoscope, 127(9), 2093-2099. PMCID: PMC5481531

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Objectives/Hypothesis: To examine the prevalence of voice disorders in young adults and identify sociodemographic factors, health conditions, and behaviors associated with voice disorder prevalence. Study Design: Cross-sectional analysis of data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health. Methods: During home interviews, 14,794 young adults, aged 24 to 34 years, reported their health conditions and behaviors. Presence and duration of voice disorders were reported over the past 12 months. We computed overall and stratified prevalence estimates by age, gender, race/ethnicity, medical conditions, smoking, and alcohol use. Multiple logistic regression was used to identify independent risk factors for a voice disorder while accounting for the complex sample design. Results: Six percent of participants reported a voice disorder lasting at least 3 days. Females had 56% greater odds of voice disorders than males. Number of days drinking alcohol was associated with voice disorders, but number of smoking days was not. Conditions that increased the likelihood of voice disorders included hypertension (OR = 1.42 [95% confidence interval {CI}: 1.07-1.89]), tinnitus (OR = 1.53 [95% CI: 1.06-2.20]), and anxiety/panic disorder (OR = 1.26 [95% CI: 1.00-1.60]). Results were independent of gender, alcohol consumption, upper respiratory symptoms, and lower respiratory conditions including asthma, bronchitis/emphysema, and gastrointestinal symptoms (diarrhea/nausea/vomiting). Conclusions: Voice disorders in young adulthood were associated with hypertension, tinnitus, and anxiety. Greater awareness of these relationships may facilitate voice evaluation among people who seek healthcare for these chronic conditions. Level of Evidence: 2b Laryngoscope, 2016


Voice
voice disorders
dysphonia
sleep apnea
allergy
hypertension
tinnitus
anxiety disorder
depression
alcohol use
smoking
infection
respiratory symptoms


JOUR



Bainbridge, Kathleen E.
Roy, Nelson
Losonczy, Katalin G.
Hoffman, Howard J.
Cohen, Seth M.



2017


The Laryngoscope

127

9

2093-2099


12/23/2016




1531-4995

10.1002/lary.26465

PMC5481531


6752