You are here: Home / Publications / Publications Database / Exploring the Overlap Between Sexual Victimization and Offending Among Young Women Across Neighborhoods

Exploring the Overlap Between Sexual Victimization and Offending Among Young Women Across Neighborhoods

Farrell, Chelsea. (2017). Exploring the Overlap Between Sexual Victimization and Offending Among Young Women Across Neighborhoods. Journal of Interpersonal Violence.


Octet Stream icon 6829.ris — Octet Stream, 2 kB (2164 bytes)

The relationship between victimization and subsequent maladaptive behaviors such as offending is well established. To a lesser degree, a contextual lens has been used to examine how neighborhood characteristics influence the overlap between victimization and offending. The existing literature has yet to explore how the neighborhood context moderates the victim–offender overlap among young women, specifically, or whether the type of force used during sexual victimization or offending matters. This study uses data from The National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health) to examine whether concentrated disadvantage moderates the impact of sexual victimization on subsequent offending for women. Results indicate that young women who experience sexual victimization are more likely to engage in general offending regardless of neighborhood type. However, closer examination reveals that, when taking into account the type of force used in sexual victimization (physical or coerced) and the type of offending (violent, property, drug use), the overlap does indeed vary across neighborhoods. Specifically, results indicate that only coerced sexual victimization significantly affects property offending in neighborhoods with high levels of concentrated disadvantage. Related to violent offending, physical sexual victimization has a strong positive impact in less disadvantaged neighborhoods. Finally, coerced sexual victimization is significantly associated with an increased likelihood for drug use, and this relationship is consistent across neighborhoods. The findings suggest that nuances in the nature of victimization and offending need to be taken into account to fully understand the victim–offender overlap across neighborhood context.


sexual victimization,neighborhood effects,gender,offending


JOUR



Farrell, Chelsea



2017


Journal of Interpersonal Violence





1/24/2017





10.1177/0886260516689778



6829