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Dimensions of sexual orientation and sleep disturbance among young adults

Fricke, Julie; & Sironi, Maria. (2017). Dimensions of sexual orientation and sleep disturbance among young adults. Preventive Medicine Reports, 8(Supplement C), 18-24. PMCID: PMC5555087

Fricke, Julie; & Sironi, Maria. (2017). Dimensions of sexual orientation and sleep disturbance among young adults. Preventive Medicine Reports, 8(Supplement C), 18-24. PMCID: PMC5555087

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We examined associations among 3 dimensions of sexual orientation (identity, attraction, and behavior) and sleep disturbance among young adults in the United States. Using Wave IV of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (respondents aged 24–32, N=14,334), we ran multivariate logistic regressions to estimate the probability of reporting trouble falling asleep, trouble staying asleep, and short sleep duration, based on specific sexual orientation categories. Results after controlling for mental health indicate that these categories are more likely to have trouble falling asleep: women who identify as “bisexual” (OR=1.85, CI: 1.21,2.82), women attracted to “both sexes” (OR=1.31, CI: 1.00,1.72), women who have had “mostly opposite sex” partners (OR=1.40, CI: 1.10,1.77), and men who have had “mostly same sex” partners (OR=2.28, CI: 1.21,4.31). For trouble staying asleep: women who identify as “bisexual” (OR=1.48, CI: 1.01,2.18), men and women attracted to “both sexes” (OR=1.81, CI: 1.12,2.91; OR=1.27, CI: 1.00,1.60), and women who have had “mostly opposite sex partners” (OR=1.38, CI: 1.13,1.69). For short sleep duration: women who identify as “mostly straight” or “mostly gay” (OR=1.27, CI: 1.01,1.60; OR=2.64, CI: 1.36,5.14), men who identify as “bisexual” (OR=2.56, CI: 1.26,5.18), women attracted only to “same sex” (OR=2.42, CI: 1.48,3.96), men attracted to “both sexes” (OR=1.88, CI: 1.21,2.93), and women who have had “mostly same sex” partners (OR=4.90, CI: 2.10,11.46). Given the variation in findings, it is necessary to analyze each sexual orientation dimension and the categories within each dimension to adequately understand sleep disturbances among sexual minority populations.




JOUR



Fricke, Julie
Sironi, Maria



2017


Preventive Medicine Reports

8

Supplement C

18-24


August 5, 2017




2211-3355

10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.07.008

PMC5555087


7097