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School sanctions, race, ethnicity, and neighborhood poverty in adulthood

Campbell, Kyla. (2017). School sanctions, race, ethnicity, and neighborhood poverty in adulthood. Master's thesis / Doctoral dissertation, Bowling Green State University.

Campbell, Kyla. (2017). School sanctions, race, ethnicity, and neighborhood poverty in adulthood. Master's thesis / Doctoral dissertation, Bowling Green State University.

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There has been a substantial increase in the use of school sanctions over the past several decades due to the adoption of “zero tolerance” policies (Hutchinson & Pullman, 2007). Research on the school to prison pipeline suggests that school sanctions are associated with negative outcomes in adolescence and adulthood. The literature has not yet explored the relationship between exclusionary discipline experiences and neighborhood attainments. The current study uses The National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health) to examine the relationship between school sanctions and neighborhood poverty, with incarceration and adult transitions as potential mediators of this relationship. Prior research has found that experiencing exclusionary school discipline is particularly harmful to black students (Wolf & Kupchik, 2017) and therefore, I explore the roles of race and ethnicity as potential moderators in this relationship. I have four hypotheses about the nature of the relationship between school sanctions and neighborhood attainment: 1) suspension and expulsion will predict a higher level of neighborhood poverty in adulthood; 2) this relationship will be mediated by incarceration; 3) the relationship will be mediated adult transitions, including educational attainment, employment status, and family transitions; and 4) the relationship between school sanctions and neighborhood poverty will be strongest for black students who have experienced exclusionary school discipline. Partial support is found for hypotheses 1, 3, and 4, while hypothesis 2 is not supported.




THES



Campbell, Kyla


Swisher, Raymond, R.

2017



MA






Bowling Green State University






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