You are here: Home / Publications / Publications Database / Contraceptive use patterns among women with prediabetes, undiagnosed diabetes and diagnosed diabetes

Contraceptive use patterns among women with prediabetes, undiagnosed diabetes and diagnosed diabetes

Britton, L. E.; Berry, D. C.; & Crandell, J. L. (2017). Contraceptive use patterns among women with prediabetes, undiagnosed diabetes and diagnosed diabetes. Presented at the Contraception, Atlanta, GA.

Britton, L. E.; Berry, D. C.; & Crandell, J. L. (2017). Contraceptive use patterns among women with prediabetes, undiagnosed diabetes and diagnosed diabetes. Presented at the Contraception, Atlanta, GA.

Octet Stream icon 7162.ris — Octet Stream, 2 kB (2397 bytes)

Objectives: This study examined contraceptive use among women with prediabetes, undiagnosed diabetes and diagnosed diabetes.

Methods: This cross-sectional study used data from 5643 sexually active, nonpregnant women aged 24–32 in the nationally representative National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health) study (2007–2008). Prediabetes and diabetes were identified by hemoglobin A1c from blood specimens and diagnosis by self-report or antihyperglycemic medication use. The primary outcome was most effective method used in the past year: highly effective (sterilization, IUD, implant, the pill, patch, ring or injectable), moderately effective (condoms, spermicides, natural family planning or withdrawal) or none. Logistic regression models were adjusted for education, insurance, health care access and race/ethnicity. Unless otherwise indicated, women who were not prediabetic or diabetic were the reference group.

Results: When sample weights were applied to estimate population percentages, 3.6% of the population had diagnosed diabetes, 3.1% had undiagnosed diabetes, 20.6% had prediabetes, and 72.7% did not have prediabetes or diabetes. Contraceptive use varied significantly by diabetes status (p<.0001). The odds of using a highly effective method were lower among women with diabetes (AOR, 0.67; 95% CI, 0.51–0.87) and prediabetes (AOR, 0.81; 95% CI, 0.66–0.99). Women with diabetes had greater odds of not using a method (AOR, 1.73; 95% CI, 1.16–2.57). Diagnosed women had significantly higher odds of nonuse than undiagnosed women (AOR, 1.98; 95% CI, 1.03–3.8).

Conclusions: Women with prediabetes and diabetes used less effective methods. Further evaluating family planning for women with prediabetes and diabetes is critical for helping women achieve reproductive goals while minimizing the risks associated with elevated blood glucose during pregnancy.




CONF

North American Forum on Family Planning


Britton, L. E.
Berry, D. C.
Crandell, J. L.



2017



96

4

283-284




Contraception

Atlanta, GA

0010-7824

10.1016/j.contraception.2017.07.083



7162