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Self-control over time: Implications for work, relationship, and well-being outcomes

Converse, Patrick D.; Beverage, Michael S.; Vaghef, Keemia; & Moore, Lisa S. (2018). Self-control over time: Implications for work, relationship, and well-being outcomes. Journal of Research in Personality, 73(Supplement C), 82-92.

Converse, Patrick D.; Beverage, Michael S.; Vaghef, Keemia; & Moore, Lisa S. (2018). Self-control over time: Implications for work, relationship, and well-being outcomes. Journal of Research in Personality, 73(Supplement C), 82-92.

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Extensive research has demonstrated that self-control predicts a range of outcomes, but little work has examined the implications of self-control over time. This study examined self-control levels and slopes across adolescence and young adulthood as predictors in the work, relationship, and well-being domains. Drawing from developmental tasks theory, two possibilities were explored: high levels of self-control or increasing levels of self-control across this developmental period may be important to these outcomes. Data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health were used, with self-control measured across four waves and outcomes measured during the last wave. Results were more consistent with the proposition that high levels of self-control across this developmental period may be important to the outcomes examined.


Self-control
Developmental tasks
Work
Relationships
Well-being


JOUR



Converse, Patrick D.
Beverage, Michael S.
Vaghef, Keemia
Moore, Lisa S.



2018


Journal of Research in Personality

73

Supplement C

82-92






0092-6566

10.1016/j.jrp.2017.11.002



7199