You are here: Home / Publications / Publications Database / The influence of psychopathic personality traits, low self-control, and nonshared environmental factors on criminal involvement

The influence of psychopathic personality traits, low self-control, and nonshared environmental factors on criminal involvement

Boccio, Cashen M.; & Beaver, Kevin M. (2018). The influence of psychopathic personality traits, low self-control, and nonshared environmental factors on criminal involvement. Youth Violence and Juvenile Justice, 16(1), 37-52.

Boccio, Cashen M.; & Beaver, Kevin M. (2018). The influence of psychopathic personality traits, low self-control, and nonshared environmental factors on criminal involvement. Youth Violence and Juvenile Justice, 16(1), 37-52.

Octet Stream icon 7217.ris — Octet Stream, 1 kB (1594 bytes)

Theoretical and empirical research has linked variation in parental and peer socialization patterns as well as criminogenic traits, particularly psychopathy and low self-control, to criminal involvement. Findings from this body of scholarship, however, have generally been produced without adequately controlling for genetic confounding. The current study addresses this gap in the literature by analyzing data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health using a genetically informative research design. This study employs monozygotic difference scores analyses in order to examine the effects of psychopathic personality traits (PPTs), low self-control, and nonshared environmental factors on involvement with criminal behavior while controlling for genetic factors. The results indicated that of the four outcomes examined, PPTs were only associated with involvement in violent behavior. In addition, the results revealed that delinquent peers was the only nonshared environmental factor associated with any of the outcome measures. © 2016, © The Author(s) 2016.


criminal behavior
low self-control
nonshared environments
psychopathy


JOUR



Boccio, Cashen M.
Beaver, Kevin M



2018


Youth Violence and Juvenile Justice

16

1

37-52


December 21, 2016





10.1177/1541204016684176



7217