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Change in Body Mass Index and Its Impact on Incidence of Hypertension in 18–65-Year-Old Chinese Adults

Ren, Qian; Su, Chang; Wang, Huijun; Wang, Zhihong; Du, Wenwen; & Zhang, Bing. (2016). Change in Body Mass Index and Its Impact on Incidence of Hypertension in 18–65-Year-Old Chinese Adults. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 13(3), 257.

Ren, Qian; Su, Chang; Wang, Huijun; Wang, Zhihong; Du, Wenwen; & Zhang, Bing. (2016). Change in Body Mass Index and Its Impact on Incidence of Hypertension in 18–65-Year-Old Chinese Adults. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 13(3), 257.

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AIMS: This study assessed change in body mass index (BMI) and its impact on the incidence of hypertension in 18- to 65-year-old Chinese adults. METHODS: Two waves of data were collected in 2006 and 2011 by the China Health and Nutrition Survey (CHNS) with samples drawn from nine provinces in China. The logistic regression model was used to examine the association between change in BMI and the incidence of hypertension, and odds ratio (OR) and 95% confident interval (95% CI) were calculated. RESULTS: The risk of incident hypertension increased as the quartile of the BMI difference value (D-value) increased in men (OR and 95% CI for the highest quartile vs. the lowest quartile: 2.303, 1.560-3.401, respectively, p for trend < 0.001) and women (OR and 95% CI for the highest quartile vs. the lowest quartile: 1.745, 1.199-2.540, respectively, p for trend = 0.004). Compared with non-overweight subjects in 2011, the ORs of incident hypertension were all significantly higher for overweight subjects, regardless of their overweight status at baseline (p < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: In conclusion, the results from this study provide unequivocal evidence that prevention of weight gain is likely to have a great impact on the incidence of hypertension in Chinese adults.




JOUR



Ren, Qian
Su, Chang
Wang, Huijun
Wang, Zhihong
Du, Wenwen
Zhang, Bing



2016


International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health

13

3

257







10.3390/ijerph13030257



2402