Early, Regular Breast-Milk Pumping May Lead to Early Breast-Milk Feeding Cessation

Yourkavitch, Jennifer; Rasmussen, Kathleen M.; Pence, Brian W.; Aiello, Allison E.; Ennett, Susan T.; Bengtson, Angela M.; Chetwynd, Ellen; & Robinson, Whitney R. (2018). Early, Regular Breast-Milk Pumping May Lead to Early Breast-Milk Feeding Cessation. Public Health Nutrition, 21(9), 1726-36.

Yourkavitch, Jennifer; Rasmussen, Kathleen M.; Pence, Brian W.; Aiello, Allison E.; Ennett, Susan T.; Bengtson, Angela M.; Chetwynd, Ellen; & Robinson, Whitney R. (2018). Early, Regular Breast-Milk Pumping May Lead to Early Breast-Milk Feeding Cessation. Public Health Nutrition, 21(9), 1726-36.

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OBJECTIVE: To estimate the effect of early, regular breast-milk pumping on time to breast-milk feeding (BMF) and exclusive BMF cessation, for working and non-working women. DESIGN: Using the Infant Feeding Practices Survey II (IFPS II), we estimated weighted hazard ratios (HR) for the effect of regular pumping (participant defined) compared with non-regular/not pumping, reported at month 2, on both time to BMF cessation (to 12 months) and time to exclusive BMF cessation (to 6 months), using inverse probability weights to control confounding. SETTING: USA, 2005-2007. SUBJECTS: BMF (n 1624) and exclusively BMF (n 971) IFPS II participants at month 2. RESULTS: The weighted HR for time to BMF cessation was 1.62 (95 % CI 1.47, 1.78) and for time to exclusive BMF cessation was 1.14 (95 % CI 1.03, 1.25). Among non-working women, the weighted HR for time to BMF cessation was 2.05 (95 % CI 1.84, 2.28) and for time to exclusive BMF cessation was 1.10 (95 % CI 0.98, 1.22). Among working women, the weighted HR for time to BMF cessation was 0.90 (95 % CI 0.75, 1.07) and for time to exclusive BMF cessation was 1.14 (95 % CI 0.96, 1.36). CONCLUSIONS: Overall, regular pumpers were more likely to stop BMF and exclusive BMF than non-regular/non-pumpers. Non-working regular pumpers were more likely than non-regular/non-pumpers to stop BMF. There was no effect among working women. Early, regular pumpers may need specialized support to maintain BMF.




JOUR



Yourkavitch, Jennifer
Rasmussen, Kathleen M.
Pence, Brian W.
Aiello, Allison E.
Ennett, Susan T.
Bengtson, Angela M.
Chetwynd, Ellen
Robinson, Whitney R.



2018


Public Health Nutrition

21

9

1726-36










10805

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