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Association of High Traditional Masculinity and Risk of Suicide Death: Secondary Analysis of the Add Health Study

Coleman, Daniel; Feigelman, William; & Rosen, Zohn. (2020). Association of High Traditional Masculinity and Risk of Suicide Death: Secondary Analysis of the Add Health Study. JAMA Psychiatry.

Coleman, Daniel; Feigelman, William; & Rosen, Zohn. (2020). Association of High Traditional Masculinity and Risk of Suicide Death: Secondary Analysis of the Add Health Study. JAMA Psychiatry.

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In the United States, men die by suicide at 3.5 times the rate of women. One driver of this gender disparity may be high traditional masculinity (HTM), a set of norms that includes competitiveness, emotional restriction, and aggression. Quantitative studies of HTM are interrelated with discourse on hegemonic masculinity. Using norm- and trait-based measures, HTM men were found to have higher suicidal ideation (SI), but to our knowledge, the association with suicide death has not been tested with a credible measure of HTM.Add Health is a nationally representative study of adolescents into adulthood. Feigelman and colleagues found 9 Add Health variables associated with suicide (Figure, A and B) and weak nonsignificant effects for depression and gun access. This study hypothesizes that HTM is associated with suicide, depression, gun access, and the 9 variables previously noted. No prediction was made for HTM regarding SI or suicide attempts.


suicide
suicide attempts
mortality
gender equity


JOUR



Coleman, Daniel
Feigelman, William
Rosen, Zohn



2020

2/17/2020

JAMA Psychiatry









2168-622X

10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2019.4702



8993