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Concordance between Self-Reported and Actigraphy-Assessed Sleep Duration among African-American Adults: Findings from the Jackson Heart Sleep Study

Citation

Jackson, Chandra L.; Ward, Julia B; .; Johnson, Dayna A.; Sims, Mario; Wilson, James; & Redline, Susan S. (2020). Concordance between Self-Reported and Actigraphy-Assessed Sleep Duration among African-American Adults: Findings from the Jackson Heart Sleep Study. Sleep, 43(3), zsz246. PMCID: PMC7066489

Abstract

STUDY OBJECTIVES: Most epidemiological studies assess sleep duration using questionnaires. Interpreting this information requires understanding the extent to which self-reported habitual sleep reflects objectively-assessed sleep duration, particularly among African Americans, who are at risk for sleep health disparities.
METHODS: Among African-American participants of the Jackson Heart Sleep Study, we investigated differences in questionnaire-based self-assessed average sleep duration and self-assessed wake-bed time differences compared to actigraphy-based assessments of total sleep time and average time in bed. Linear regression models provided estimates of concordance between actigraphy-based and self-reported sleep duration.
RESULTS: Among 821 adults, self-assessed average sleep duration was lower than self-assessed wake-bed time differences (6.4 +/- 1.4 vs. 7.5 +/- 1.7 hours, p<0.0001). Mean actigraphy-based total sleep time was 6.6 +/- 1.2 hours, and actigraphy-based average time in bed was 7.6 +/- 1.2 hours. Self-assessed average sleep duration and actigraphy-based total sleep time were modestly correlated (r=0.28, p<0.0001). Self-assessed average sleep duration underestimated actigraphy-based total sleep time by -30.7 (95% confidence intervals (CI): -36.5 - -24.9) minutes. In contrast, self-assessed wake-bed time differences overestimated actigraphy-based total sleep time by 45.1 (95% CI: 38.6-51.5) minutes. In subgroup analyses, self-assessed average sleep duration underestimated actigraphy-based measures most strongly in those with insomnia symptoms.
CONCLUSION: Among African Americans, self-assessed average sleep duration underestimated objectively-measured sleep while self-assessed wake-bed time differences overestimated objectively-measured sleep. Sleep measurement property differences should be considered when investigating disparities in sleep and evaluating their associations with health outcomes.

URL

http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/sleep/zsz246

Reference Type

Journal Article

Year Published

2020

Journal Title

Sleep

Author(s)

Jackson, Chandra L.
Ward, Julia B
.
Johnson, Dayna A.
Sims, Mario
Wilson, James
Redline, Susan S.

Article Type

Regular

PMCID

PMC7066489

Data Set/Study

Jackson Heart Sleep Study

Continent/Country

United States of America

State

Nonspecific