Menu Close

Parental Status and Biological Functioning: Findings from the Nashville Stress and Health Study

Citation

DeAngelis, Reed T.; Taylor, John; & Friedman, Katherine L. (2020). Parental Status and Biological Functioning: Findings from the Nashville Stress and Health Study. Population Research and Policy Review, 39(2), 365-73.

Abstract

Does childrearing affect the biological functioning of parents? To address this question, we analyze cross-sectional survey and biomarker data from Vanderbilt University’s Nashville Stress and Health Study, a probability sample of non-Hispanic White and Black working-age adults from Davidson County, Tennessee (2011–2014; n = 1252). Multivariable regression analyses reveal a linear dose–response relationship between the number of children living in a respondent’s home and (a) increased allostatic load, and (b) decreased leukocyte telomere length. We found no differences in biological functioning between childless respondents and empty-nest parents. These findings also withstood controls for a battery of socioeconomic factors. The implications of these findings and suggestions for future research are discussed.

URL

https://doi.org/10.1007/s11113-019-09534-1

Reference Type

Journal Article

Journal Title

Population Research and Policy Review

Series Title

DeAngelis, R.T., Taylor, J. & Friedman, K.L. Correction to: Parental Status and Biological Functioning: Findings from the Nashville Stress and Health Study. Popul Res Policy Rev 39, 773 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11113-020-09598-4

Author(s)

DeAngelis, Reed T.
Taylor, John
Friedman, Katherine L.

Year Published

2020

Volume Number

39

Issue Number

2

Pages

365-73

Reference ID

12711