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Varying Levels of Food Insecurity Associated with Clinically Relevant Depressive Symptoms in U.S. Adults Aged 60 Years and Over: Results from the 2005-2014 National Health and Nutrition Survey

Citation

Brooks, J. M.; Petersen, C. L.; Titus, A. J.; Umucu, E.; Chiu, C.; Bartels, S. J.; & Batsis, J. A. (2019). Varying Levels of Food Insecurity Associated with Clinically Relevant Depressive Symptoms in U.S. Adults Aged 60 Years and Over: Results from the 2005-2014 National Health and Nutrition Survey. J Nutr Gerontol Geriatr, 38(3), 218-230. PMCID: PMC6677622

Abstract

Food insecurity refers to restricted or uncertain access to and ineffective utilization of nutritious and safe foods. Although food insecurity is linked to poorer physical health consequences among older adults, national estimates are not well known on food insecurity and depression. Using the 2005-2014 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, this study examines the associations between varying food insecurity levels and clinically relevant depressive symptoms (defined by PHQ-9 ≥ 10) among adults ≥60 years old (n = 7969). Rates of clinically relevant depressive symptoms in marginal, low, and very low food security were 12.3, 16.3, and 25.2%, respectively. Marginal, low, and very low food security were significantly associated with clinically relevant depressive symptoms: odds ratio (OR) = 1.12 (95% confidence intervals [CI] 1.07-1.18), OR = 1.07 (95% CI 1.03-1.12), and OR = 1.24 (95% CI 1.16-1.32), respectively. Given the intersection of food insecurity and depression, geriatric health professionals should work to improve health and nutrition programs for older adults at risk for or experiencing both public health concerns.

Reference Type

Journal Article

Year Published

2019

Journal Title

J Nutr Gerontol Geriatr

Author(s)

Brooks, J. M.
Petersen, C. L.
Titus, A. J.
Umucu, E.
Chiu, C.
Bartels, S. J.
Batsis, J. A.

PMCID

PMC6677622

State

NIHMS1531616