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Race-Related Differences among Elderly Urban Residents: A Cohort Study, 1975-1984.

Citation

Ford, Amasa B.; Haug, Marie R.; Jones, Paul K.; Roy, Ann W.; & Folmar, Steven J. (1990). Race-Related Differences among Elderly Urban Residents: A Cohort Study, 1975-1984.. Journals of Gerontology Series B: Psychological Sciences and Social Sciences, 45(4).

Abstract

A population-based cohort of 1,598 urban residents, aged 65 years and over, was studied in 1975, and 645 survivors were re-interviewed in their places of residence in 1984. Since 25.6 percent of the subjects were Black, it was possible to examine race-related changes in health, function, and socioeconomic status over nine years, as well as differences in rates of institutionalization and mortality. Aging urban Blacks continue to experience major social disadvantages, especially in education and income. After age 74, although Blacks probably experience more favorable mortality rates and less institutionalization, they consider themselves less healthy and are more likely to develop diabetes, hypertension, and glaucoma. Although Blacks rate their own mental health lower, this difference is not supported by other measures. Functionally, elderly Whites are more likely to be dependent in certain activities of daily living. The findings are consistent with the previously observed mortality crossover; predictors of mortality are identified but do not differ by race. Lower institutionalization rates among older Blacks may be partly explained by different living patterns, poverty, and a higher proportion of males among surviving Blacks.

URL

http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/geronj/45.4.s163

Reference Type

Journal Article

Journal Title

Journals of Gerontology Series B: Psychological Sciences and Social Sciences

Author(s)

Ford, Amasa B.
Haug, Marie R.
Jones, Paul K.
Roy, Ann W.
Folmar, Steven J.

Year Published

1990

Volume Number

45

Issue Number

4

Reference ID

796