Menu Close

Risk, Resilience, and Depressive Symptoms in Low-Income African American Fathers

Citation

Bamishigbin, Olajide N.; Dunkel Schetter, Christine; Guardino, Christine M.; Stanton, Annette L.; Schafer, Peter; Shalowitz, Madeleine U.; Lanzi, Robin Gaines; Thorp, John M., Jr.; & Raju, Tonse N. K., for the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Human Development Community Child Health Network (CCHN) (2017). Risk, Resilience, and Depressive Symptoms in Low-Income African American Fathers. Cultural Diversity & Ethnic Minority Psychology, 23(1), 70-80. PMCID: PMC6644062

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Parental depression influences family health but research on low-income African American fathers is limited. The primary goal of the present study was to examine the role of paternal risk factors and resilience resources in predicting depressive symptoms in the year after birth of a child in a sample of African American fathers. We hypothesized that paternal risk factors (low socioeconomic status [SES], perceived stress, negative life events, racism, avoidant coping style) and resources (social support, self-esteem, collective efficacy, approach-oriented coping style) would predict depressive symptoms in fathers at 1 year postbirth controlling for depressive symptoms at 1 month postbirth.
METHOD: African American fathers (n = 296) of predominantly low SES from 5 U.S. regions were interviewed at 1 and 12 months after birth of a child regarding potential risk factors, resilience resources, and depressive symptoms.
RESULTS: Depressive symptoms were low on average. However, hierarchical linear regression analyses revealed that avoidant coping style and experiences of racism predicted more depressive symptoms in fathers nearly a year after the birth of a child controlling for symptoms at 1 month.
CONCLUSIONS: How fathers cope with stress and common everyday experiences of racism contributed to depressive symptoms in the year following birth of a child. Interventions that target race-related stressors and decrease avoidant coping may promote better outcomes in this important and understudied population.

URL

http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/cdp0000088

Reference Type

Journal Article

Year Published

2017

Journal Title

Cultural Diversity & Ethnic Minority Psychology

Author(s)

Bamishigbin, Olajide N.
Dunkel Schetter, Christine
Guardino, Christine M.
Stanton, Annette L.
Schafer, Peter
Shalowitz, Madeleine U.
Lanzi, Robin Gaines
Thorp, John M., Jr.
Raju, Tonse N. K., for the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Human Development Community Child Health Network (CCHN)

PMCID

PMC6644062