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Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Intake among Chilean Preschoolers and Adolescents in 2016: A Cross-Sectional Analysis

Citation

Essman, Michael; Popkin, Barry M.; Corvalán, Camila; Reyes, Marcela; & Taillie, Lindsey Smith (2018). Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Intake among Chilean Preschoolers and Adolescents in 2016: A Cross-Sectional Analysis. Nutrients, 10(11), 1767. PMCID: PMC6265687

Abstract

Background: Chile has the highest sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) sales of any country and a growing burden of childhood obesity. This study examines SSB intake in Chilean children after a 5% SSB tax increase in 2014 but prior to marketing, labeling, and school policies implemented in 2016. Methods: 24 hour-recalls were collected in 2016 from two cohorts comprised of preschoolers 3-5 years of age (n=961) and adolescents 12-14 years of age (n=770) from low-moderate income neighborhoods. Beverages were categorized as regulated or unregulated according to whether they exceeded nutrient thresholds established by the 2016 policies.
Results: Preschoolers consumed mainly beverage calories from regulated dairy beverages and substitutes (109 kcal, SD 30), unregulated dairy beverages (102 kcal, SD 24), and regulated fruit and vegetables drinks (44 kcal, SD 20). For adolescents, the greatest contributions came from regulated sodas (77 kcal, SD 47), regulated dairy beverages and substitutes (41 kcal, SD 16), and unregulated coffee and tea (41 kcal, SD 11). Overall, regulated beverages provided a greater proportion of calories than unregulated for preschoolers (15.0% vs 11.8%) and for adolescents (9.1% vs 5.0%).
Conclusions: Before major policy implementation, regulated beverages accounted for a higher percentage of energy intake than unregulated beverages among both age groups. Future research will be needed to evaluate the impact of Chile’s new policies on sugary beverage intake in children.

URL

https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10111767

Reference Type

Journal Article

Year Published

2018

Journal Title

Nutrients

Author(s)

Essman, Michael
Popkin, Barry M.
Corvalán, Camila
Reyes, Marcela
Taillie, Lindsey Smith

PMCID

PMC6265687