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Early Gut Microbiome: A Good Start in Nutrition and Growth May Have Lifelong Lasting Consequences

Citation

Thompson, Amanda L. (2019). Early Gut Microbiome: A Good Start in Nutrition and Growth May Have Lifelong Lasting Consequences. In Azcarate-Peril, M. Andrea; Teles, Flavia R. F.; & Bruno-Barcena, Jose M. (Eds.), How Fermented Foods Feed a Healthy Gut Microbiota: A Nutrition Continuum (pp. 239-58). Cham, Switzerland: Springer.

Abstract

Initial colonization, establishment, and development of the gut microbiota play an essential role in long-term health. The birthing process is the first major exposure to microorganisms, though there is evidence of pre-natal exposures to low-abundance microorganisms. Different modes of birth facilitate colonization of different microorganisms, which are further modulated by early diet (breast feeding vs formula feeding), environment, and exposure to antibiotics. This chapter discusses mechanisms and consequences of differential colonization and maintenance of the infant microbiota, and their implications for overall health.

URL

https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-28737-5_10

Reference Type

Book Chapter

Book Title

How Fermented Foods Feed a Healthy Gut Microbiota: A Nutrition Continuum

Author(s)

Thompson, Amanda L.

Editor(s)

Azcarate-Peril, M. Andrea
Teles, Flavia R. F.
Bruno-Barcena, Jose M.

Year Published

2019

Pages

239-58

Edition

First

Publisher

Springer

City of Publication

Cham, Switzerland

Reference ID

11911