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Maya Culture, Population and the Environment in the Yucatán Peninsula

Citation

Faust, Betty & Bilsborrow, Richard E. (2000). Maya Culture, Population and the Environment in the Yucatán Peninsula. In Lutz, Wolfgang; Prieto, Leonel; & Sanderson, Warren (Eds.), Population, Development and Environment on the Yucatán Peninsula: From Ancient Maya to 2030 (pp. 73-107). Laxenburg, Austria: International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis.

Abstract

This volume is the third in a series of case studies on population, development, and environment interactions. In the style of the previous two studies, this report is divided into two parts. The first part is a set of studies of the history, culture, environment, and economy of the Yucatan peninsula. The chapters focus on issues ranging from the causes of the Mayan collapse in the tenth century to the performance of the Yucatan economy from 1970 to 1993. The second part builds on the first through the construction of a set of computer simulation models of population, development, and environment interactions. Taken together, the models deal with population growth by education, migration between the Yucatan and other parts of Mexico and within the peninsula itself, tourism, the quality of beaches, the congestion of historical sites, the fisheries of the Yucatan coast, and land use.

Reference Type

Book Chapter

Book Title

Population, Development and Environment on the Yucatán Peninsula: From Ancient Maya to 2030

Author(s)

Faust, Betty
Bilsborrow, Richard E.

Editor(s)

Lutz, Wolfgang
Prieto, Leonel
Sanderson, Warren

Year Published

2000

Pages

73-107

Publisher

International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis

City of Publication

Laxenburg, Austria

Reference ID

1214