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The Association between the “Plate it up Kentucky” Supermarket Intervention and Changes in Grocery Shopping Practices among Rural Residents

Citation

Gustafson, Alison; Ng, Shu Wen; & Jilcott Pitts, Stephanie B. (2019). The Association between the "Plate it up Kentucky" Supermarket Intervention and Changes in Grocery Shopping Practices among Rural Residents. Translational Behavioral Medicine, 9(5), 865-74.

Abstract

Rural communities experience higher rates of obesity, and residents have a lower intake of fruits and vegetables. Innovative healthy food promotions in supermarkets may improve healthy food access and dietary intake among residents, yet few supermarket interventions have been translated to the rural context. The aim of this project was to determine whether a supermarket-based intervention "Plate it Up Kentucky" was associated with change in fruit, vegetable, and sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) purchases among rural supermarket customers. Ten Kentucky supermarkets participated in an intervention titled "Plate It Up" to provide in-store promotions, including recipe cards, samples, price reductions for specific fruits and vegetables, and marketing on shopping carts. Six stores in rural Kentucky and North Carolina were controls. Two cross-sectional customer intercept surveys were conducted among grocery store customers in Spring of 2016 (baseline, n = 131 control and n = 181 intervention store customers) and Spring-Summer of 2017 (post-intervention, n = 100 control and n = 83 intervention store customers). Customers were asked to provide store receipts and participate in a survey assessing grocery shopping practices and dietary intake. The primary outcome was purchases in fruit and vegetable (obtained from receipt data). The secondary outcome was dietary intake (captured with the National Cancer Institute's Fruit and Vegetable Screener and BRFSS questionnaire). An adjusted, difference-in-difference model was used to assess the differences between control and intervention store customers at baseline, post-intervention, and then between the two time points. Post-intervention, there was a greater increase in customers stating that they "liked the food" as one main reason for shopping in the store where surveyed among intervention versus control store customers. The adjusted difference-in-difference model indicated that intervention store customers spent on average 8% more on fruits and vegetables from baseline to post-intervention (p = .001) when compared with customers from control stores. Among controls, spending on SSB decreased from $3.61 at baseline to $3.25 at post-intervention, whereas among intervention customers, spending on SSB decreased from $2.75 at baseline to $1.81 at post-intervention (p = .02). In-store promotions that provide recipe cards, samples, price reductions for specific fruits and vegetables, and marketing on shopping carts hold promise as a method to promote healthy food purchases among rural supermarket customers at two time points.

URL

http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/tbm/ibz064

Reference Type

Journal Article

Journal Title

Translational Behavioral Medicine

Author(s)

Gustafson, Alison
Ng, Shu Wen
Jilcott Pitts, Stephanie B.

Year Published

2019

Volume Number

9

Issue Number

5

Pages

865-74

PMCID

PMC Journal - In Process

Reference ID

12558