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High and Rising Mortality Rates Among Working-Age Adults

Citation

National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine,; Committee on Rising Midlife Mortality Rates and Socioeconomic Disparities, [; Robert A. Hummer & Kathleen Mullan Harris; , Members]; Committee on Population, [; Robert A. Hummer & Kathleen Mullan Harris; , Members]; Committee on National Statistics,; & Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education, (Online ahead of print). High and Rising Mortality Rates Among Working-Age Adults. Washington D.C.: The National Academies Press.

Abstract

High and Rising Mortality Rates among Working Age Adults highlights the crisis of rising premature mortality that threatens the future of the nation's families, communities, and national wellbeing. This report identifies the key drivers of increasing death rates and disparities in working-age mortality over the period 1990 to 2017; elucidates modifiable risk factors that could alleviate poor health in the working-age population, as well as widening health inequalities; identifies key knowledge gaps and make recommendations for future research and data collection to fill those gaps; and explores potential policy implications. After a comprehensive analysis of the trends in working-age mortality by age, sex, race/ethnicity, and geography using the most up-to-date data, this report then looks upstream to the macrostructural factors (e.g., public policies, macroeconomic trends, social and economic inequality, technology) and social determinants (e.g., socioeconomic status, environment, social networks) that may affect the health of working-age Americans in multiple ways and through multiple pathways.

URL

https://doi.org/10.17226/25976

Reference Type

Book

Year Published

Online ahead of print

Author(s)

National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine,
Committee on Rising Midlife Mortality Rates and Socioeconomic Disparities, [
Robert A. Hummer & Kathleen Mullan Harris
, Members]
Committee on Population, [
Robert A. Hummer & Kathleen Mullan Harris
, Members]
Committee on National Statistics,
Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education,

Continent/Country

United States of America

State

Nonspecific