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Evaluating the Effects of Two Alcohol Reduction Counseling Interventions on Intimate Partner Violence Perpetration: Secondary Analysis of a Three-Arm Randomized Controlled Trial among Vietnamese Men with HIV

Citation

Hershow, Rebecca B.; McNaughton-Reyes, Heath Luz; Ha, Tran Viet; Chander, Geetanjali; Mai, Nguyen Vu Tuyet; Sripaipan, Teerada; Dowdy, David W.; Latkin, Carl A.; Hutton, Heidi E.; & Pettifor, Audrey E., et al. (Online ahead of print). Evaluating the Effects of Two Alcohol Reduction Counseling Interventions on Intimate Partner Violence Perpetration: Secondary Analysis of a Three-Arm Randomized Controlled Trial among Vietnamese Men with HIV. Addiction.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Evidence suggests that alcohol reduction interventions decrease intimate partner violence (IPV) perpetration, although this remains untested in low- and middle-income countries and among men with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). This study evaluates the effectiveness of alcohol reduction counseling interventions on IPV perpetration among men on antiretroviral therapy (ART) and tests whether alcohol use explains the intervention effects.
DESIGN: Secondary analysis of data from a three-arm randomized controlled trial among ART patients with hazardous alcohol use. Participants were recruited from March 2016 through May 2017.
SETTING: Thai Nguyen, Vietnam.
PARTICIPANTS: Male participants (n=426).
INTERVENTIONS AND COMPARATORS: Participants received a two-session Brief Intervention (BI), a six-session Combined Intervention (CoI), or the standard of care (SOC) comprising alcohol treatment referrals. Alcohol reduction counseling interventions were guided by Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and Motivational Enhancement Therapy. They were delivered by psychosocial counselors over 3 months.
MEASUREMENTS: IPV perpetration was measured using shortened Conflict Tactics Scale 2 and alcohol use was measured using Timeline Followback.
FINDINGS: BI and CoI participants reported reduced IPV perpetration at 3 months compared with SOC participants (BI: adjusted odds ratio [aOR]=0.27, 95% Confidence Interval [CI] 0.11, 0.65; CoI: aOR=0.50, 95% CI 0.22, 1.13); the association was only significant for the BI group. Intervention effects were not sustained at 6 and 12 months. There was little evidence that alcohol use acted as a mediator (Indirect effect, BI: aOR=0.84, 95% CI 0.63, 1.04; Indirect effect, CoI: aOR=0.86, 95% CI 0.66, 1.03).
CONCLUSIONS: Among Vietnamese men receiving antiretroviral therapy, alcohol reduction counseling interventions appeared to reduce intimate partner violence perpetration immediately post-intervention but reductions were not sustained at 6 and 12 months and were not explained by alcohol reduction.

URL

http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/add.15496

Reference Type

Journal Article

Article Type

Regular

Year Published

Online ahead of print

Journal Title

Addiction

Author(s)

Hershow, Rebecca B.
McNaughton-Reyes, Heath Luz
Ha, Tran Viet
Chander, Geetanjali
Mai, Nguyen Vu Tuyet
Sripaipan, Teerada
Dowdy, David W.
Latkin, Carl A.
Hutton, Heidi E.
Pettifor, Audrey E.
Maman, Suzanne
Frangakis, Constantine
Go, Vivian F.

Data Set/Study

Reducing Hazardous Alcohol Use & HIV Viral Load Trial

Continent/Country

Vietnam