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Work Organization and Workforce Commitment: A Study of Plants and Employees in the U.S. and Japan

Citation

Lincoln, James R. & Kalleberg, Arne L. (1985). Work Organization and Workforce Commitment: A Study of Plants and Employees in the U.S. and Japan. American Sociological Review, 50(6), 738-760.

Abstract

We address the hypothesis that organizational commitment is higher among Japanese than U. S. workers and that this commitment gap may be an outcome of the greater prevalence of "welfare corporatist" structures in Japanese firms. With data from a survey of over 8,000 employees in nearly 100 plants in Japan and the United States, we estimate a multilevel model of the processes shaping individuals' organizational commitment and work satisfaction. Consistent with a theory of "corporatist" control, we find that participatory work structures and employee services ("paternalism") are more typical of Japanese plants yet function in both countries to raise commitment and morale. Other evidence for and against predictions from "corporatist" theory is discussed.

URL

http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2095502

Reference Type

Journal Article

Year Published

1985

Journal Title

American Sociological Review

Author(s)

Lincoln, James R.
Kalleberg, Arne L.