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Quality of Maternal and Newborn Health Care in Ethiopia: A Cross-Sectional Study

Citation

Biadgo, Abera; Legesse, Aynalem; Estifanos, Abiy S.; Singh, Kavita; Mulissa, Zewdie; Kiflie, Abiyou; Magge, Hema; Bitewulign, Befikadu; Abate, Mehiret; & Alemu, Haregeweyni (2021). Quality of Maternal and Newborn Health Care in Ethiopia: A Cross-Sectional Study. BMC Health Services Research, 21(1), 679. PMCID: PMC8272353

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Despite reports of universal access to and modest utilization of maternal and newborn health services in Ethiopia, mothers and newborns continue to die from preventable causes. Studies indicate this could be due to poor quality of care provided in health systems. Evidences show that high quality health care prevents more than half of all maternal deaths. In Ethiopia, there is limited knowledge surrounding the status of the quality of maternal and newborn health care in health facilities. This study aims to assess the quality of maternal and neonatal health care provision at the health facility level in four regions in Ethiopia.
METHODOLOGY: This study employed a facility-based cross-sectional study design. It included 32 health facilities which were part of the facilities for prototyping maternal and neonatal health quality improvement interventions. Data was collected using a structured questionnaire, key informant interviews and record reviews. Data was entered in Microsoft Excel and exported to STATA for analysis. Descriptive analysis results are presented in texts, tables and graphs. Quality of maternal and neonatal health care was measured by input, process and outputs components. The components were developed by computing scores using standards used to measure the three components of the quality of maternal and neonatal health care.
RESULT: The study was done in a total of 32 health facilities: 5 hospitals and 27 health centers in four regions. The study revealed that the average value of the quality of the maternal and neonatal health care input component among health facilities was 62%, while the quality of the process component was 43%. The quality of the maternal and neonatal health output component was 48%. According to the standard cut-off point for MNH quality of care, only 5 (15.6%), 3 (9.3%) and 3 (10.7%) of health facilities met the expected input, process and output maternal and neonatal health care quality standards, respectively.
CONCLUSION: This study revealed that the majority of health facilities did not meet the national MNH quality of care standards. Focus should be directed towards improving the input, process and output standards of the maternal and neonatal health care quality, with the strongest focus on process improvement.

URL

http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12913-021-06680-1

Reference Type

Journal Article

Year Published

2021

Journal Title

BMC Health Services Research

Author(s)

Biadgo, Abera
Legesse, Aynalem
Estifanos, Abiy S.
Singh, Kavita
Mulissa, Zewdie
Kiflie, Abiyou
Magge, Hema
Bitewulign, Befikadu
Abate, Mehiret
Alemu, Haregeweyni

Article Type

Regular

PMCID

PMC8272353

Continent/Country

Ethiopia

Sex/Gender

Ciswomen

ORCiD

Singh, K - 0000-0001-8670-2262