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Bad Jobs in America: Standard and Nonstandard Employment Relations and Job Quality in the United States

Citation

Kalleberg, Arne L.; Reskin, Barbara F.; & Hudson, Ken (2000). Bad Jobs in America: Standard and Nonstandard Employment Relations and Job Quality in the United States. American Sociological Review, 65(2), 256-78.

Abstract

The prevalence of nonstandard jobs is a matter of concern if, as many assume, such jobs are bad. We examine the relationship between nonstandard employment (on-call work and day labor, temporary-help agency employment, employment with contract companies, independent contracting, other self-employment, and part-time employment in "conventional" jobs) and exposure to "bad" job characteristics, using data from the 1995 Current Population Survey. Of workers age 18 and over, 31 percent are in some type of nonstandard employment. To assess the link between type of employment and bad jobs, we conceptualize "bad jobs" as those with low pay and without access to health insurance and pension benefits. About one in seven jobs in the United States is bad on these three dimensions. Nonstandard employment strongly increases workers' exposure to bad job characteristics, net of controls for workers' personal characteristics, family status, occupation, and industry.

URL

http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2657440

Reference Type

Journal Article

Journal Title

American Sociological Review

Author(s)

Kalleberg, Arne L.
Reskin, Barbara F.
Hudson, Ken

Year Published

2000

Volume Number

65

Issue Number

2

Pages

256-78

Reference ID

1557