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Significant Increase in Young Adults’ Snacking between 1977-1978 and 1994-1996 Represents a Cause for Concern!

Citation

Zizza, Claire A.; Siega-Riz, Anna Maria; & Popkin, Barry M. (2001). Significant Increase in Young Adults' Snacking between 1977-1978 and 1994-1996 Represents a Cause for Concern!. Preventive Medicine, 32(4), 303-310.

Abstract

Background: Studies on children and adolescents suggest a large increase in the role of snacking; however, little is know about changes in the snacking behavior of young adults.
Methods: USDA's nationally representative surveys from 1977-1978 to 1994-1996 are used to study snacking trends among 8,493 persons 19-29 years old.
Results: Snacking prevalence increased from 77 to 84% between 1977-1978 and 1994-1996. The nutritional contribution of snacks to total daily energy intake went from 20 to 23%, primarily because energy consumed per snacking occasion increased by 26% and the number of snacks per day increased 14%. The mean daily caloric density (calorie per gram of food) of snacks increased from 1.05 to 1.32 calories. The energy contribution of high-fat desserts to the total calories from snacking decreased (22 to 14%), however, this food group remained the most important source of energy. The energy contribution of high-fat salty snacks doubled. Sweetened and alcoholic beverages remained important energy contributors.
Conclusion: This large increase in total energy and energy density of snacks among young adults in the United States may be contributing to our obesity epidemic.

URL

http://dx.doi.org/10.1006/pmed.2000.0817

Reference Type

Journal Article

Year Published

2001

Journal Title

Preventive Medicine

Author(s)

Zizza, Claire A.
Siega-Riz, Anna Maria
Popkin, Barry M.