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Sibling, Peer, Neighbor, and Schoolmate Correlations as Indicators of the Importance of Context for Adolescent Development

Citation

Duncan, Greg J.; Boisjoly, Johanne; & Harris, Kathleen Mullan (2001). Sibling, Peer, Neighbor, and Schoolmate Correlations as Indicators of the Importance of Context for Adolescent Development. Demography, 38(3), 437-47.

Abstract

We use nationally representative data to calculate correlations in achievement and delinquency between genetically differentiated siblings within a family, between peers as defined by adolescents' "best friend" nominations, between schoolmates living in the same neighborhood, and between grademates within a school. We find the largest correlations between siblings, especially identical twins. Grademate and neighbor correlations are small. Peer-based correlations are considerably larger than grademate and neighbor correlations but not larger than most sibling correlations. The data suggest that family-based factors are several times more powerful than neighborhood and school contexts in affecting adolescents' achievement and behavior.

URL

http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/dem.2001.0026

Reference Type

Journal Article

Journal Title

Demography

Author(s)

Duncan, Greg J.
Boisjoly, Johanne
Harris, Kathleen Mullan

Year Published

2001

Volume Number

38

Issue Number

3

Pages

437-47

Reference ID

1696