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Maternal Work and Child Care in China: A Multi-Method Analysis

Citation

Short, Susan E.; Chen, Feinian; Entwisle, Barbara; & Zhai, Fengying (2002). Maternal Work and Child Care in China: A Multi-Method Analysis. Population and Development Review, 28(1), 31-57.

Abstract

The majority of women in China, including mothers of young children, are in the labor force. This article investigates the relationship between mothers' work and child care and explores how type of work affects level of involvement in children's care. Substantive understandings of the relationship between mothers' work and child care may well depend on the way work is conceptualized and measured, especially nonwage work. Nearly two-thirds of women in China live in rural areas, where nonwage work predominates. Analysis of data from eight provinces indicates that wage workers spend less time in child care, but so do women with heavy nonwage demands. Women's involvement in multiple economic activities has consequences for both work-child care compatibility and work intensity, and may be especially important in efforts to categorize women's work in industrializing economies. Because the majority of the world's women do not work in the wage sector, the implications of these findings extend beyond China.

URL

https://www.jstor.org/stable/3092756

Reference Type

Journal Article

Journal Title

Population and Development Review

Author(s)

Short, Susan E.
Chen, Feinian
Entwisle, Barbara
Zhai, Fengying

Year Published

2002

Volume Number

28

Issue Number

1

Pages

31-57

Reference ID

1776