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Psychosocial Factors and Preterm Birth among African American and White Women in Central North Carolina

Citation

Dole, Nancy; Savitz, David A.; Siega-Riz, Anna Maria; Hertz-Picciotto, Irva; McMahon, Michael J.; & Buekens, Pierre (2004). Psychosocial Factors and Preterm Birth among African American and White Women in Central North Carolina. American Journal of Public Health, 94(8), 1358-1365. PMCID: PMC1448456

Abstract

Objectives: We assessed associations between psychosocial factors and preterm birth, stratified by race in a prospective cohort study.
Methods: We surveyed 1898 women who used university and public health prenatal clinics regarding various psychosocial factors.
Results: African Americans were at higher risk of preterm birth if they used distancing from problems as a coping mechanism or reported racial discrimination. Whites were at higher risk if they had high counts of negative life events or were not living with a partner. The association of pregnancy-related anxiety with preterm birth weakened when medical comorbidities were taken into account. No association with preterm birth was found for depression, general social support, or church attendance.
Conclusions: Some associations between psychosocial variables and preterm birth differed by race.

URL

http://dx.doi.org/10.2105/ajph.94.8.1358

Reference Type

Journal Article

Year Published

2004

Journal Title

American Journal of Public Health

Author(s)

Dole, Nancy
Savitz, David A.
Siega-Riz, Anna Maria
Hertz-Picciotto, Irva
McMahon, Michael J.
Buekens, Pierre

PMCID

PMC1448456