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Comparing Disciplinary Infraction Rates of North Carolina Fair Sentencing and Structured Sentencing Inmates: A Natural Experiment

Citation

Memory, John M.; Guo, Guang; Parker, Ken; & Sutton, Tom (1999). Comparing Disciplinary Infraction Rates of North Carolina Fair Sentencing and Structured Sentencing Inmates: A Natural Experiment. The Prison Journal, 79(1), 45-71.

Abstract

Using data collected from June 1, 1995, to August 30, 1996, the researchers compared the disciplinary conviction rates of North Carolina prison inmates admitted during the study period before the truth-in-sentencing law and inmates admitted during that period under the truth-in-sentencing law. Based on deterrence theory, the researchers hypothesized that pre-truth-in-sentencing inmates, who could lose time off for good behavior and parole as results of a disciplinary conviction, would have higher disciplinary conviction rates than truth-in-sentencing inmates. Truth-in-sentencing inmates, with shorter sentences, could lose neither time off for good behavior nor parole as a result of disciplinary conviction. Cox regression and negative binomial regression procedures using control variables identified in the research literature generally supported the research hypotheses.

URL

https://doi.org/10.1177/0032885599079001004

Reference Type

Journal Article

Journal Title

The Prison Journal

Author(s)

Memory, John M.
Guo, Guang
Parker, Ken
Sutton, Tom

Year Published

1999

Volume Number

79

Issue Number

1

Pages

45-71

Reference ID

2503