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World War II Mobilization in Men’s Work Lives: Continuity or Disruption for the Middle Class?

Citation

Dechter, Aimée R. & Elder, Glen H., Jr. (2004). World War II Mobilization in Men's Work Lives: Continuity or Disruption for the Middle Class?. American Journal of Sociology, 110(3), 761-793. PMCID: PMC5027899

Abstract

The labor needs of World War II fueled a growing demand for both military and war industry personnel. This longitudinal study investigates mobilization into these competing activities and their work life effects among men from themiddle class. Hazard estimates show significant differences in wartime activities across occupations, apart from other deferment criteria. By war’s end, critical employment, in contrast to military service, is positively associated with supervisory responsibility for younger men and with occupation change. This empoloyment does not predict postwar career advancement up to the 1970s. By comparison, men who were officers had a “pipeline” to advancement after the war, whereas other service men fared worse than nonveterans.

URL

http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/422662

Reference Type

Journal Article

Year Published

2004

Journal Title

American Journal of Sociology

Author(s)

Dechter, Aimée R.
Elder, Glen H., Jr.

PMCID

PMC5027899