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Genitourinary Complications of Inherited Epidermolysis Bullosa: Experience of the National Epidermolysis Bullosa Registry and Review of the Literature

Citation

Fine, Jo-David; Johnson, Lorraine B.; Weiner, Madeline; Stein, Amy; Cash, Sarah; DeLeoz, Joy; Devries, David T.; & Suchindran, Chirayath M. (2004). Genitourinary Complications of Inherited Epidermolysis Bullosa: Experience of the National Epidermolysis Bullosa Registry and Review of the Literature. Journal of Urology, 172(5, pt. 1), 2040-2044.

Abstract

PURPOSE: We determined the frequency with which 6 genitourinary tract complications (urethral meatal stenosis, urinary retention, bladder hypertrophy, hydronephrosis secondary to ureteral strictures, pyelonephritis and cystitis) occur in inherited epidermolysis bullosa (EB) in the American EB population.
MATERIALS AND METHODS: Up to 16 years of longitudinal followup was done in 3,280 consecutively enrolled patients in the National EB Registry, a National Institutes of Health funded epidemiological study covering the entire continental United States. Data were stratified by major EB type and subtype. Frequencies of occurrence were determined for each of 6 genitourinary tract variables and stratified into 10 mutually exclusive, major EB subtypes.
RESULTS: Urinary tract complications occurred in a minority of patients across all major EB subtypes with the highest frequency seen in Herlitz junctional EB (JEB-H). Urethral meatus stenosis was the most common complication, occurring in 11.6% and 8.0% of patients with JEB-H and Hallopeau-Siemens recessive dystrophic EB (RDEB), respectively. Urinary retention, hydronephrosis and bladder hypertrophy occurred in 9.3%, 7.0% and 4.6% of JEB-H cases, respectively. In contrast, pyelonephritis and cystitis were most often seen in the setting of generalized EB simplex (Koebner variant) and inversa RDEB.
CONCLUSIONS: The urinary tract may be involved in any subtype of inherited EB, although these complications usually arise in patients with the most severe subtypes of junctional and recessive dystrophic disease. Chronic surveillance for the presence of genitourinary tract disease activity is warranted, especially in patients with JEB and RDEB, given the potential for longterm kidney injury if untreated.

URL

http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/01.ju.0000143200.86683.2c

Reference Type

Journal Article

Year Published

2004

Journal Title

Journal of Urology

Author(s)

Fine, Jo-David
Johnson, Lorraine B.
Weiner, Madeline
Stein, Amy
Cash, Sarah
DeLeoz, Joy
Devries, David T.
Suchindran, Chirayath M.