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Dietary Diversity Scores Can Be Improved through the Use of Portion Requirements: An Analysis in Young Filipino Children

Citation

Daniels, Melissa C.; Adair, Linda S.; Popkin, Barry M.; & Truong, Y. K. (2009). Dietary Diversity Scores Can Be Improved through the Use of Portion Requirements: An Analysis in Young Filipino Children. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 63(2), 199-208.

Abstract

Objectives: Early childhood malnutrition is a pressing international concern which dietary diversity scores (summary scores of food groups in the diet) may be helpful in addressing. We explored three current research needs surrounding diversity scores: the impact of portion size on score function, the relationship of scores to nutrient adequacy and density and the ability of scores to function as screening tools.
Subjects/Methods: 1810 children, age 24 months. Cross sectional study of a birth cohort.
Results: We evaluated two nine food group dietary diversity scores based on 0 and 10 g minimum food group requirements for their relationship to nutrient adequacy and nutrient density. Both scores were significantly correlated with nutrient adequacy and density and predicted statistically significant increases (P<0.05) in the probability of adequacy for all nutrients. However, correlations and predicted increases were somewhat larger for the 10 g score. We also considered the sensitivity and specificity of each score for detecting low and high nutrient adequacy in the population. The 10 g cutoff improved score ability to predict low nutrient adequacy, and reduced the misclassification of subjects for all comparisons.
Conclusions: This research suggests that the score without portion requirements reflects dietary adequacy, but when feasible, further refinement of diversity scores is desirable through the application of minimum portion requirements.

URL

http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/sj.ejcn.1602927

Reference Type

Journal Article

Year Published

2009

Journal Title

European Journal of Clinical Nutrition

Author(s)

Daniels, Melissa C.
Adair, Linda S.
Popkin, Barry M.
Truong, Y. K.