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Neighborhoods and Environmental Determinants of Infectious Diseases

Citation

Emch, Michael E. & Carrel, Margaret A. (2011). Neighborhoods and Environmental Determinants of Infectious Diseases.. Nriagu, Jerome O. (Ed.) (pp. 64-71). Amsterdam: Elsevier.

Abstract

The incidence of infectious disease is unevenly distributed in time and space. The combined influences of environmental context and population composition affect where and when diseases occur. Studying the interactions between people and their environment at a neighborhood level can help to determine what neighborhood effects on health exist beyond individual-level risk factors and can also reveal how disease cycles can be broken. Defining an individual's neighborhood and the spatial scale relevant to studying a disease can be a complex process, and definitions may be based on factors such as governmental administrative units, historical boundaries, social networks, or daily activity spaces. Using various quantitative and qualitative methods, public health researchers can uncover what human–environment interactions are taking place at the neighborhood level that result in disease outcomes.

Reference Type

Book Section

Year Published

2011

Author(s)

Emch, Michael E.
Carrel, Margaret A.