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Nutrient and Food Group Intakes of Women with and without Bulimia Nervosa and Binge Eating Disorder during Pregnancy

Citation

Siega-Riz, Anna Maria; Haugen, Margaretha; Meltzer, Helle Margrete; Von Holle, Ann F.; Hamer, Robert M.; Torgersen, Leila; Knoph Berg, Cecilie; Reichborn-Kjennerud, Ted; & Bulik, Cynthia M. (2008). Nutrient and Food Group Intakes of Women with and without Bulimia Nervosa and Binge Eating Disorder during Pregnancy. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 87(5), 1346-1355. PMCID: PMC2663958

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Little is known concerning the dietary habits during pregnancy of women with eating disorders that may lie in the causal pathway of adverse birth outcomes. OBJECTIVE: We examined the nutrient and food group intakes of women with bulimia nervosa and binge-eating disorder during pregnancy and compared these with intakes of women with no eating disorders.
DESIGN: Data on 30,040 mother-child pairs from the prospective Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study were used in cross-sectional analyses. Dietary information was collected by using a food-frequency questionnaire during the first half of pregnancy. Statistical testing by eating disorder categories with the non-eating-disorder category as the referent group was conducted by using log means adjusted for confounding and multiple comparisons. Food group differences were analyzed by using a Wilcoxon's two-sided normal approximation test that was also adjusted for multiple comparisons.
RESULTS: Women with binge-eating disorder before and during pregnancy had higher intakes of total energy, total fat, monounsaturated fat, and saturated fat, and lower intakes of folate, potassium, and vitamin C than the referent (P < 0.02). Women with incident binge-eating disorder during pregnancy had higher intakes of total energy and saturated fat than the referent (P = 0.01). Several differences emerged in food group consumption between women with and without eating disorders, including intakes of artificial sweeteners, sweets, juice, fruit, and fats.
CONCLUSION: Women with bulimia nervosa before and during pregnancy and those with binge-eating disorder before pregnancy exhibit dietary patterns that differ from those in women without eating disorders, that are reflective of their symptomatology, and that may influence pregnancy outcomes.

URL

http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ajcn/87.5.1346

Reference Type

Journal Article

Year Published

2008

Journal Title

American Journal of Clinical Nutrition

Author(s)

Siega-Riz, Anna Maria
Haugen, Margaretha
Meltzer, Helle Margrete
Von Holle, Ann F.
Hamer, Robert M.
Torgersen, Leila
Knoph Berg, Cecilie
Reichborn-Kjennerud, Ted
Bulik, Cynthia M.

PMCID

PMC2663958