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The Population, Agriculture and Environment Nexus in Latin America: Country-Level Evidence from the Latter Half of the Twentieth Century

Citation

Carr, David L.; Lopez, Anna Carla; & Bilsborrow, Richard E. (2009). The Population, Agriculture and Environment Nexus in Latin America: Country-Level Evidence from the Latter Half of the Twentieth Century. Population and Environment, 30(6), 222-246.

Abstract

Unprecedented population growth and migration accompanied equally unprecedented land use and land cover change in Latin America during the latter decades of the twentieth century. Country-level data are examined with bivariate statistics to determine relationships between changes in population patterns and land use (agriculture and forest cover) from 1961 to 2001. In South America, large forest areas were eliminated during the period, while exceptionally high rates of forest clearing were ubiquitous in the Central America/Caribbean region. These environmental changes accompanied dissimilar initial population densities and different effects of population change on agriculture. While interacting with a host of political, socio-economic, and geographic processes, it appears that both Malthusian and Boserupian demographic processes were important drivers of deforestation. Given continued, though slowing, population growth, increased urban consumption, and future land use constraints, policy makers face myriad challenges in advancing sustainable agriculture-population dynamics in Latin America.

URL

http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11111-009-0090-4

Reference Type

Journal Article

Year Published

2009

Journal Title

Population and Environment

Author(s)

Carr, David L.
Lopez, Anna Carla
Bilsborrow, Richard E.