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Stress Processes and Trajectories of Depressive Symptoms in Early Life: Gendered Development

Citation

Adkins, Daniel E.; Wang, Victor; & Elder, Glen H., Jr. (2008). Stress Processes and Trajectories of Depressive Symptoms in Early Life: Gendered Development. Advances in Life Course Research, 13, 107-136.

Abstract

Despite considerable advances, significant gaps remain in our knowledge of how gender differences in depression develop over the life course. Applying mixed model growth curves to the National Longitudinal Survey of Adolescent Health, this study investigates gendered variation in the causes and course of depressive symptom trajectories across early life. Results show curvilinear trajectories, rising through adolescence, and falling in young adulthood, with female disadvantage persistent, but narrowing over time. The effects of stressful life events (SLEs) and social support on depressive symptoms are notably larger for females. Overall, results indicate that stress processes contributing to depression are highly gendered in early life with females generally experiencing higher levels of depressive symptoms and showing greater sensitivity to both the detrimental effects of SLEs and the buffering effect of social support.

URL

http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S1040-2608(08)00005-1

Reference Type

Journal Article

Year Published

2008

Journal Title

Advances in Life Course Research

Author(s)

Adkins, Daniel E.
Wang, Victor
Elder, Glen H., Jr.